When people shop at Walmart, they’re doing business with a store. When they shop at your store, they’re doing business with a person. That distinction is important to many customers who expect personalized service and are willing to pay more for it.

Source: Infusionsoft

Competing with the likes of online giants like Amazon and offline superstores like Walmart can be daunting for small business owners. How do you compete? Focus on what you have that they don’t.

Share Your Expertise: Because you’re a small business, you have valuable expertise on your products that customers look for. You know what the quality of your products is, how well they function, which audience they fit, and more. You know how to help each customer find the product he or she needs. This is valuable.

Provide Extraordinary Customer Experience: Treat each customer incredibly well. Give them one-on-one attention and they will not only pay you back with loyalty, but will also tell their friends. Because there are so many places to shop, online and off, it is the customer service that makes the difference and creates customer loyalty. (Read more customer experience tips here).

 Services: Because you are a small business, you can treat each service ticket as more than a number. You can serve your customers one by one. Whether the service is a rental, repair, or class, you can give each customer an excellent experience.

You don’t have to take a “one-size-fits-all” approach, so you can cater to customers who have unique needs. The big box stores simply can’t do that. 

Source: Infusionsoft

Don’t worry about how the big guys do business. Use the strengths of being a small business to win over customers that will be loyal.

Remember: as a small business, you’re not after low-price buyers; you’re after customers who seek, understand, and are willing to pay for quality.

Source: Infusionsoft

 

 

About Author

Holly Wade

Holly Wade is a lover of words and marketing. She can’t read great writing without smiling, and she can’t watch a commercial without analyzing its success as marketing content. She gets a little carried away every time she goes to the library, and she always sides with using the Oxford comma. She’s loved writing for Rain Retail Software since she started in 2010 after graduating from Brigham Young University.

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