Photo mistakes. I’m not talking about being photo bombed or wearing an outfit you’ll regret. Those type of photo mistakes will be fun to look at in years to come. I’m talking about your product photos and any other photos on your website. Making mistakes with those will cost you.

Source: Wyzowl Study

 

The bad news? Some of our embarrassing photos will live forever in memories of our friends.

The good news? We can greatly influence shopper behavior by using stellar photos.

Wield the power of good photography by ensuring you never make any of the below mistakes. Ever. Again

Mistake #1: Keeping Them in the Dark 

In order to love your products and want to buy them, customers need to be able to see them. This requires good lighting. Take the time to make sure your product photos show all of the great details they have.

Mistake #2: Too Much Variety

Variety is the spice of life. Except when it comes to thumbnail height. Make sure all of your thumbnails are the same height. It looks so bad if they aren’t. It drives me crazy.

Mistake # 3:  Going So Big, You Don’t Bring The Sale Home

Use good quality photos, but don’t use them in a huge file size. It’s great if you want to print a huge photo for your store, not so great if your customers are trying to load it on their phones. They’ll click away.

According to surveys done by Akamai and Gomez.com,

“Nearly half of web users expect a site to load in 2 seconds or less, and they tend to abandon a site that isn’t loaded within 3 seconds, 79% of web shoppers who have trouble with web site performance say they won’t return to the site to buy again.”

Mistake #4: Only Showing Customers One Option

Whether you’re selling sweaters, blankets, guitars, or anything that comes in multiple colors, don’t make the mistake of thinking all of your customers will either (A), want to buy the product in the most popular color, or (B) want to try to visualize what it actually looks like. Use photos that inform. Give multiple angles, size comparison, and show your products being used.

Mistake #5: Not Letting Photos Be Worth Their 1000 Words

Take advantage of the ability to let photos tell a story. Look at what we learn from this apple photo:

 

The photo impresses us and tells us that the MacBook Air is so thin it could fit inside an envelope. We’re much more impressed by the photo than we would be if we were just told.

Mistake # 6: Not Listening To Science

Just as we will look in the direction our friends or family members are looking in in real life, we follow the gaze of models in product photography. Check out the eye tracking study photos below. We are more likely to read the text we’re meant to read in the second photo where the woman’s eyes direct us there. Take advantage of this by guiding online shoppers where you want them to look by using the direction of a gaze.

 

Mistake #7:  Having Too Much of a Good Thing

Words are great. I (obviously) love them. But sometimes too much text can be overwhelming and distract us.

“Software company 37Signals found that when they moved away from a text-heavy page product page (with a nicely designed graphic showcasing the product’s features) to a full-width image of a smiling customer, conversions shot up but 102.5%.”

Source: LemonStand.

Mistake #8: Not Dotting Your I’s

Once you have things the way you like them on your website, be sure to check it out on several different devices to see what your customers will see as they shop on their mobile devices. You can also find websites that will show you how your website looks on different devices. Mobile shopping is big and will only get bigger. Be ready for it. 

Source: Google

 

Go the Extra Mile and Try Out Video

Videos can help you connect with your customers and break the barrier to create a human connection. 

Source: Google

In The End

Take the time to check that you’re not making these 8 mistakes and you’ll be golden. Photos can be the difference between an increase in sales, and a lack of sales. Use them to grow your business.

 

About Author

Holly Wade

Holly Wade is a lover of words and marketing. She can’t read great writing without smiling, and she can’t watch a commercial without analyzing its success as marketing content. She gets a little carried away every time she goes to the library, and she always sides with using the Oxford comma. She loves writing articles that help small retail businesses find success. She's been with Rain since 2010 after graduating from Brigham Young University.

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