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How to Create Elevator Pitch That Highlights Your Value

How to Create Elevator Pitch That Highlights Your Value

 

“I don’t have time.” “I’m in a hurry.” Heard that before? I know I have.

People are constantly in a rush oftentimes, an elevator ride isn’t enough for you to present an idea. At least that’s what I thought.

The truth is, it’s possible. If you know how.

 

Step 1: Write Down Your Current Presentation

 

First and foremost you should brainstorm. Write down the details you mention in conversations about your company. Make sure to add all of the information that you know.

When writing your presentation ask yourself general questions:

  • What is the problem we solve?
  • What do we stand for?
  • How do we solve problems?
  • What other benefits do we create?

End with asking more complex ones:

  • Why is our solution the best?
  • What do we do differently?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of the product?

Be honest in your answers, don’t be afraid to mention some disadvantages. It’s a great way to prepare yourself for some objections and have an argumentative answer if needed.

You are the only one seeing this draft. If you answer all of the questions mentioned above, you have a great starting point for creating an impressionable pitch.

Here’s an example:

Sleeknote is a company that provides an online tool. This tool helps companies mostly in generating more leads, but at the same time can provide service of guiding your visitor, increasing sales, and connecting with your audience. We stand for non-intrusiveness and better user experience.

Our tool lets companies create popups that generate value for their marketing and sales teams. Our solution has proven to be effective for various e-commerce brands and is so far the best solution on the net to increase the number of leads.

Our company is different in a couple of ways: it provides amazing customer service, has a collection of fully developed and constantly improved features, and lets you create better designs that complement customers’ experience.”

Don’t be afraid to write something generic; it’s the first step and more information here won’t hurt.

Prefer to brainstorm in sections? Here is something called a pitch canvas. It was created by David Beckett, one of the TED Talk speech coaches.

 

 

It’s mostly used for pitches that are three minutes long. However, it does wonders as the first step toward a better elevator pitch.

 

Step 2: Highlight Important Information

 

It might seem that everything in your presentation is important and it’s true. What you mentioned is important. The goal is to find out what you can use for a quick and interesting overview, and what should be left for the second meeting.

To do so, look at your text and highlight facts that are interesting about your project.

To look at it critically, imagine being an investor who hears about new ideas everyday. Impress yourself.

Here’s how I did it:

“Sleeknote is a company that provides an online tool. This tool helps companies mostly in generating more leads, but at the same time can provide service of guiding your visitor, increasing sales, and connecting with your audience. We stand for non-intrusiveness and better user experience.

Our tool lets companies create popups that generate value for their marketing and sales teams. Our solution has proven to be effective for various e-commerce brands and is so far the best solution on the net to increase the number of leads.

Our company is different in a couple of ways: it provides amazing customer service, has a collection of fully developed and constantly improved features, and lets you create better designs that complement customers’ experience.”

I marked information that gives context to my company in orange and the benefits that it provides in blue. Here’s what I need to include in my elevator pitch:

  • Sleeknote is an online tool.
  • With it, you can create popups.
  • The tool is effective for e-commerce businesses.

 

And put emphasis on these benefits:

  • More leads.
  • Increased sales.
  • Better user experience.
  • Variety Of features.
  • Complimentary design.

 

Take your time and have three benefits and information pieces in each. Don’t forget to prioritize.

 

Step 3: Delete Information That Does Not Add Value

 

It’s common to have more than three benefits and context pieces after you highlight the text. However, you need to make sure that there’s enough time for you to present and the only way to do that, is by cutting down on information that doesn’t add value.

Thinking that you can’t cut out any of the highlighted aspects is normal. So don’t worry and let me guide you with an example:

We have five benefits highlighted in our presentation. Two of them need to go.

  • Variety of features; and
  • Complimentary design.

These two will be deleted from our main picks, since:

A variety of features is an explanation of why people can get more leads and increase sales. It’s a great point for the second meeting where you can go through the most common features, but you don’t have time for that in your elevator pitch. Mentioning it won’t add value to your speech.

The complimentary design is an explanation of why popups help to create an advanced user experience. That’s yet again, a perfect point for the second meeting when you can explain details that go into making a well-performing design, but it’s not beneficial for your fast speech.

All in all, avoid mentioning benefits that need a complicated explanation and aim for the ones that create an impression or lead to an immediate reaction.

 

Step 4: Systemize With A Template

 

Now you know what are the points you will make, but how to make them?

You can use a simple canvas to help you manage your thoughts.

Here’s an example of a flow canvas:

 

 

The template indicates introducing yourself at the beginning of the speech and most importantly mentions why anyone should listen.

In one of her masterclasses, Sara Blakely, the founder of “Spanx” said she would call companies and start by saying something along the lines: “Hi, I am Sara and I have a way to change underwear industry forever.” Remember, you need to give a reason to listen.

Having that in mind, make sure to continue with introducing your project and putting emphasis on the benefits.

 

Step 5: Re-Write

 

Now that you know the company’s main benefits, a context that you want to present, and the flow of your speech. Start re-writing your previous presentation in accordance with the flow template above.

Here’s how ours worked out:

Hi, I’m Aiste and I work as a Marketer for Sleeknote. Give me five seconds and I will change the way you collect leads forever. Sleeknote is an online tool, which efficiently helps e-commerce companies through popup campaigns. With it, you will collect thousands of leads, boost sales, and make visitors feel welcomed like in a physical store.

And here’s another try:

What if I told you that popups are making a comeback? I’m marketer from Sleeknote and that wasn’t a false statement. The company I work in created an online tool that will help your e-commerce store by generating more leads, boosting sales, and improving your user experience. Let me come and show you how.

These examples are quite literally, elevator pitches. But take a moment to change the ending and you have a perfect 30-second pitch for every occasion.

 

Conclusion

 

Polishing a pitch can take time, but it can help to raise awareness and create connections in a matter of seconds, literally.

Take your time to perfect your pitch, write a couple of variations, and have fun with showcasing it to different people.

When you feel ready, let the world hear it!

 

About The Author

Aiste Macyte

Aiste Macyte is a content marketer at Sleeknote: a company that helps e-commerce brands engage their site visitors—without hurting the user experience. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aistemacyte/

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